“Shifting into Purer Consciousness ~ Integrating Spiritual Transformation with the Human Experience” by author Yvonne Perry

In her latest book, Shifting into Purer Consciousness ~ Integrating Spiritual Transformation with the Human Experience, author Yvonne Perry shares how she has integrated the accelerated frequencies of several quantum leaps she has taken on her spiritual path. Once she learned to manage the human experience of rapid spiritual transformation, she became active in working to anchor her light body and offering coaching to help others on their journey. You may learn more about Yvonne and her book at http://shiftingintopurerconsciousness.com.

Here is the back cover blurb for this book:

Do you feel like a misfit in your own life and body? Maybe you awoke from a strange dream too vivid not to be real. Have you survived a near-death experience, had an out-of-body occurrence, or dissociative episode? Others may have noticed how you’ve changed and say, “You act like a totally different person.” Inwardly, you may be confused, overly sensitive, or so anxious it feels as though your nervous system has been hooked to an electric power line.

What if a multidimensional form of yourself — from a realm of purer consciousness — would arrive to guide you through the challenging times we are facing? Perhaps your soul has already received a download from an ascended master. Might that explain the sudden changes you’ve experienced?

You may be one of the millions of people who are spiritually growing faster than your body can tolerate. What you are experiencing is a normal response known as ascension symptoms. Regardless of what has happened, you may need help integrating these higher frequencies that are now available to you.

I will be participating in Yvonne’s book launch by hosting her on this blog during her two-week virtual book tour. On the tour, you will find nearly twenty blogs featuring written Q&A interviews, videos, book reviews, radio show interviews, excerpts from the book, and articles like these:

  • How Human Energy Affects the Earth
  • How Yvonne Published Book
  • Signs of Spiritual Awakenings
  • Why Yvonne Wrote the Book
  • How to shed personal and collective structures and belief systems that no longer support the highest good of humanity
  • Why we send love and light to people
  • Embracing divine feminine energy

Yvonne invites you to follow her to discover more about the ascension process or great shift in consciousness that we are experiencing as we enter the Age of Aquarius. Find Yvonne on Twitter: @WeR1NSpirit; Facebook http://www.facebook.com/WeAreOneinSpirit; or on her website: http://weare1inspirit.com.

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Here is the tour schedule for Shifting into Purer Consciousness:

On Saturday, June 16, Carolyn Howard-Johnson (@FrugalBookPromo) will host Yvonne with a book review on The New Book Review as well as offering an article titled “Authors Must Learn to Sell What They Write” on Sharing with Writers: http://www.sharingwithwriters.blogspot.com.

On Sunday, June 17, Jacqueline Stone (@JaqStone) will share an article titled, “Sending Light to Others” on her blog, On the Journey.  http://consciousnessjourney.blogspot.com/

On Monday, June 18, Shelly Wilson (@consciousjourny on Twitter) will host the tour stop on her blog, Journey into Consciousness, with an article: “Embracing Divine Feminine Energy.”

On Tuesday, June 19, Pat Bertram will share a Q&A written interview with the author on Dragon My Feet blog: https://dragonmyfeet.wordpress.com

On Wednesday, June 20, Shelly Wilson will host Yvonne as a guest on Journey to Consciousness Radio Show: http://www.blogtalkradio.com/journeyintoconsciousness .

On Thursday, June 21,         Barbara Techel (@joyfulpaws) shares a video clip and her book review for Shifting into Purer Consciousness on her blog: http://joyfulpaws.com.

On Friday, June 22, Carol Lawrence (@intuneparenting) hosts the tour on Social Media Help 4 U with an article titled “How Human Energy Affects the Earth.”

On Saturday, June 23, Janet Riehl (@riehlife) shares a video on her blog, Riehl Life.

On Sunday, June 24, Carl Bozeman (@CarlBozeman) opens the blog door at Spiritual Intuition where he shares his book review for Shifting into Purer Consciousness.              

On Monday, June 25, Doreen Pendgracs (Twitter: @wizardofwords) will share an article about how Yvonne published her book. See Wizard of Words: http://doreenisthewizardofwords.blogspot.com

On Tuesday, June 26, Karen Gonzalez (@FolkheartPress) will present “Why Yvonne Wrote the Book” on her blog, http://folkheartpressblog.blogspot.com

On Wednesday, June 27, Denise Demaras (@ddemaras) will share her review of Shifting into Purer Consciousness on her blog, Works in Process: http://blog.denisedemaras.com

On Thursday, June 28, Alpha Chick Mal Duane (@alphachickbook) will share an article titled “Signs Indicating a Spiritual Awakening” on http://alphachick.com/blog

On Friday, June 29, Lisa Molinelli (@bluedragonfly8) shares an article: “How to Shed Personal and Collective Structures and Belief Systems That No Longer Support the Highest Good of Humanity” on her blog, Empowering Minds.

On Saturday, June 30, Dr. Caron Goode (@Iamheartwise) shares a media release and an excerpt from the book on Live-Spirit.                             

On Sunday, July 01, Maxine Thompson (@Safari61751) will post her review of the book on her blog, http://www.maxinethompsonbooks.com. She will also host Yvonne on Dr. Maxine Show.                                                

On Monday, July 02, Irene Conlan (@ieconlan) will host Yvonne Perry on The Self Improvement Blog by presenting a review of Shifting into Purer Consciousness.

On Tuesday, July 03, Lynn Serafinn (Twitter IDs: @LynnSerafinn @SpiritAuthors and @GardenOfTheSoul) will interview Yvonne on Garden of the Soul Radio. She will also share her Q&A written interview.  See http://lynnserafinn.com/ for details.

On Wednesday, July 04, Shelagh Jones (@SpiritusShelagh) runs an article in Spiritus Spiritual Marketing Directory about how Yvonne published her book.

On Thursday, July 05, Callie Carling (@moonpoppy) will share an article: “How to shed personal and collective structures and belief systems that no longer support the highest good of humanity.” Her blog is http://createavity.com/musings.

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Also on Thursday, July 05, Shifting into Purer Consciousness Ascension Training Telesummit starts. There will be two speakers each Thursday throughout July sharing important info to make the shift easier. See http://bit.ly/InbSDC for more information.

 

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Introducing The Books of A. F. Stewart

Once Upon a Dark and Eerie… :

An ebook collection of dark short fiction, sonnets and snippets to make you shiver. A morbid and morose collection of tales designed to scare, dismay and leave you wondering. Open the pages into worlds of horror, dark fantasy, and satire, where things creep in shadowy corners, where they like to hear you scream.

Once Upon a Dark and Eerie… will show you it isn’t safe in space, why fairy tales, clowns and rubber duckies are more than what they seem and why you should lock your doors in the dark.

Chronicles of the Undead:

Temptation, vengeance, redemption. Family Secrets.

Inside the personal journals of the Harrington family, a dark and dangerous odyssey unfolds. Three members of this tormented family, Samuel, his son Edmund, and Edmund’s daughter Charlotte, struggle during the 18th and 19th century in London, England, as the lives of this family intersects with supernatural forces. Two intriguing vampires befriend, manipulate and play with all three souls, altering their lives forever. Their fears, private confidences and weaknesses are revealed as one selfish act ends in horrific tragedy, with far-reaching consequences.

Who succumbs to the seduction and danger of the vampire? Who grapples to combat the evil influence that permeates their lives?

Passing Fancies:

A book of collected short fiction, written mostly in the fantasy genre with a smattering of crime and sci-fi dropping by as well. You will find tales short to long, amusing to chilling, wandering about the pages. Take delight in the saga of werewolves, vengeful gods, and virtual reality. Thrill to accounts of murder most strange, quiver as mummies, ghosts,
and demons walk. See the end of the world and the beginning of space.

Stroll the pages of imagination.

Shadows of Poetry:

Poetry written for the blackness in your soul. Wrenching, dismal, bleak verse for those who want to walk on the dark side. Enter into a fateful and shadowy world. Shadows of Poetry is a collection of introspective poetry that skirts
the darker side of life and imagination. Verses include forlorn musings on nature, a harsher glimpse at life and a grim view of fantasy and myth. No sappy, cheerful love poems allowed.

The Incomplete Guide to Action Movies:

Here it is at last — almost everything you need to know to enjoy an action film! Presenting an irreverent manual for dissecting an action movie, a guide to the nuances of that summer blockbuster. Consider musings about crashes, clichés and cannon fodder. Discover how to survive an action movie.Learn the proper way to watch a bad action film.

Bio:

A. F. Stewart was born and raised in Nova Scotia, Canada, and still calls it home. The youngest of a family of seven children, she has always had an overly creative mind, and an active imagination. She is fond of good books (especially science fiction/fantasy), action movies, and oil painting as a hobby.

Ms. Stewart has been writing for several years, her main focus being in the fantasy genre. She also has a great interest in history and mythology, often working those themes into her books and stories.

Website: http://afallon.bravehost.com/

See Also:

Interview with A. F. Stewart
The Vampire Eleanor de Burgh from Chronicles of the Undead by A. F. Stewart

Henri Forain, a Vampire from Chronicles of the Undead by A. F. Stewart

Introducing Four New Releases From Second Wind Publishing, LLC

Four new releases from Second Wind Publishing! Click on the cover of any of these novels to read the first chapter. 

front-sta-195x304Three world-class pianists.
Two possible killers.
One dead woman.
Who is her murderer?
Who will be next? 

When acclaimed pianist Nicholas Kalman discovers his lover’s dead body, he sets out alone to find her killer. During his journey, he meets an unwitting female accomplice who soon becomes determined to help Nicholas wield his retaliation. Following a parallel path for justice, Steven Hawk, the deputy of a sleepy Southern county, is assigned to the case. Pursuing the investigation, Hawk finds himself entangled in a world of vengeance, greed and manipulation.

Performed against the backdrop of the Great Smoky Mountains of North Carolina, Staccato transports readers to a behind-the-scenes glimpse of professional musicians, the psychological twists and turns of its characters, and in the end, retribution that crashes in a crescendo of notes played at the literary pace of a maestro’s staccato. 

Staccato is the first novel of the Steven Hawk/Inola Walela thriller trilogy.
 

School of LiesWhen High School teacher Kendra Desola opens an anonymous email she expects to find a bitter complaint from a parent, or a snipe from one of her back-biting co-workers. Instead, a photoshopped attachment shows Kendra getting way too friendly with her male students. 

She intends to stop this lie before it circulates, but before she can locate the source, the suspicious death of a colleague brings the police on campus. Kendra now fears the email was a set up, to make it look like she had a motive for murder. What if the cops get wind of the email and buy the “evidence” that she’s a child molester, or a murderess, or both? Kendra plays off an unknown adversary as she desperately seeks to prove her innocence in a School of Lies.
 

Buried in Wolf LakeWhen a family’s Golden Retriever brings home the dismembered leg of a young woman, the Winnebago County Sheriff’s Department launches an investigation unlike any other. Who does the leg belong to, and where is the rest of her body? Sergeant Corrine Aleckson and Detective Elton Dawes soon discover they are up against an unidentified psychopath who targets women with specific physical features. Are there other victims, and will they learn the killer’s identity in time to prevent another brutal murder? 

 

Loving LydiaLoving Lydia, is a sweet, inspirationally touched romance, set during the regency era. When Lady Lydia, a moral, naïve young woman enters society, she is confounded by Lord Alex, a known reprobate rumored to have a dark side.  Yet he captures her heart. When Lydia is sucked into his dark world, can he save her and their love?

 

 

Available from Second Wind Publishing:
Printed Books
Ebooks 

The books are also available from Amazon in both Kindle and Trade Paperback.

 

Introducing the Authors of Second Wind

I thought a fun way to introduce the authors of Second Wind Publishing, LLC (or at least the ones who wanted to be introduced) would be to have them answer three simple questions so you can see how the different authors perceive themselves and their writing. The questions:

1. What is writing like for you?
2. What is the most thrilling thing about getting published?
3. What is the most humbling thing about getting published?

DCP_0851-136x150Lazarus Barnhill, author of The Medicine People and Lacey Took a Holiday:

1. A few years ago I came back to writing fiction after a self-imposed twelve-year period during which I did not write, and found about twenty ideas of books rattling around in my head.  My first official act was to get a notebook and list the novels, outlining them to the degree they had “marinated” in my imagination. For me, writing is getting out of the way and allowing those stories that germinated so long ago to take root, flower and bear fruit.

2. The thrill comes from somebody you don’t personally know buying a book, or seeking you out intentionally at a book signing.  It’s also thrilling when someone asks you a question about your story in such a way that you know they have read it with comprehension.

3. A couple things strike me right away. First is the praise I often get from my colleagues. When another writer whose work I admire compliments my work in a way that reveals I’ve accomplished precisely what I set out to do in the story—that is humble.  The second thing is when people I know hunt me down and pester me until I get them a copy of one of my books.  And sign it to them personally.  I’m not accustomed to adulation.

lucy_balch-113x151Lucy Balch, author of Love Trumps Logic:

1. Writing is like I’m in a time machine. I can work for hours on a story and it always feels like much less time.

2. The most thrilling thing about getting published is the knowledge that, finally, I’ll have something to show for the five years I’ve put into this obsession. Maybe I haven’t been selfishly squandering huge amounts of time?!

3.The most humbling thing about getting published is the realization that so many good writers have not yet been given the opportunity to publish. Is my book worthy of the privilege? As an unpublished author, I can always tell myself that my book will be well received when given the chance. The reality might be different. I hope not, but it’s a possibility, and once a book bombs there is no going back to the fantasy of it doing well.

jwcomputercatmail2-133x157Juliet Waldron, author of Hand-Me-Down Bride:

1. I write historicals, so writing for me is like entering a time portal—or, sometimes, like stepping out of Dr. Who’s callbox after accidentally pushing the wrong button. I have an idea of what may be there when I first look around, but I often find the world I’ve entered to be surprisingly different from my preconceptions.

2. The most thrilling thing about getting/being published is having someone you don’t know leave a message or write a review that totally “gets” the book. Shows I wasn’t as off-base as I sometimes—in those dark 3 a.m. moments—imagined.

3) The most humbling thing about getting/being published is that we have so much competition, and that there is a great deal of good writing out there. After publication there is the (IMO) far less agreeable marketing to do. The playful creation is now complete.

TracyB_3-134x150Claire Collins, author of Images of Betrayal and Fate and Destiny:

1. For me, writing is a journey. I don’t always know the final destination until I start traveling, but it’s always a rewarding trip.

2. The most thrilling thing about being published is when people read what I’ve written and they like it. I write for myself because writing is almost a compulsion for me. Readers enjoying my writing is a bonus.

3. The most humbling thing? All of the work it takes to get the books out and maintain a normal life while still trying to write. I realized pretty quick that I wasn’t superwoman. I’m still trying, but someone keeps standing on my cape.

mickeypic_1_-124x149Mickey Hoffman, author of School of Lies:

1. For me, writing is like being in that space just after you woke up from a dream but you only remember half of the dream and you spend all your waking moments trying to flesh it out.

2. I had some stories to tell and now I feel like they’ll be heard. And it really is thrilling. I feel like I’m white water rafting and I don’t need a boat!

3. I’ll be awed that anyone would take the time to read what I’ve written when they could be doing something more valuable with their time.

Deborah_J_Ledford-114x160Deborah J Ledford, author of Staccato:

1. I am an entertainer. I don’t write for a cause or to pose my own thoughts or impressions on issues. My only function is to provide a suspense-filled, exciting ride the reader won’t want to stop until they reach the very last word.

2. The most thrilling thing about being published is seeing the words I’ve worked so diligently to craft actually in print. If what I present happens to be worthy enough for readers to tell others about Staccato, that’s all I could ask for.

3. Everything about being published is humbling to me. That readers would seek out Staccato, then take the time to escape from their lives for a while, makes me more grateful than anyone could possibly know.

Sherrie_-_book_2-120x154Sherrie Hansen Decker, author of Night and Day:

1. For me, writing is like a dream vacation – a chance to escape the realities of my everyday life and travel to some faraway world where I can see the sights and meet new people.

2. For years, I wrote and wrote, wondering if anyone would ever read my words. What a wonderful feeling to be writing for readers who are eagerly awaiting my next release!

3. Every time I think I have a perfect draft, I find more errors glaring out from the pages of my proof. Very humbling . . .

Norm2-140x151Norm Brown, author of The Carpet Ride:

1. As a retired computer programmer, I see a lot of similarities between writing a novel and creating a complex software program. Both processes require an enormous attention to detail. All the little parts have to tie together in a logical way and a good flow is critical. And it’s hard work to get all the “bugs” out of a book, too.

2. The most thrilling thing for me was pulling the first copy of my book out of the box and holding it in my hands. It was exciting to see something that I actually created.

3. The most humbling thing for me about being published was discovering how much I have to learn about promoting my book. I’m still learning.

biopicsmall-136x139Jerrica Knight-Catania, author of A Gentleman Never Tells:

1. Writing for me depends on the day. Some days it’s the most wonderful romp through my dream land and other days it’s like getting a root canal.

2. Knowing that someone else believes in your work enough to put it in print is just about the most thrilling feeling. It’s great to hear friends and family say how much they enjoyed my work, but to have it validated by professionals is a whole ‘nother ball game!

3. I’m not sure I’ve been humbled at all! Haha! But I’ve never really had unrealistic expectations of myself or my work. . . . I’m prepared to correct mistakes and make cuts/edits as needed. I’m just grateful every day for the opportunities I’ve been given.

Lindlae_Parish_photo-129x151Dellani Oakes, Author of Indian Summer:

1. Writing is like a discovery process. I start with a beginning line, an idea or even just a character’s name and watch as the characters lead me where they want me to go.

2. I loved the fact that I finally was validated. Someone did think I was worth publishing and I wasn’t just “Wasting time with all that writing.”

3. Humbling? Wow, I think the most humbling – perhaps humiliating – step in the publishing process is all the rejection you get until someone finally says “Yes, we want you!”

Margay_touch_up-129x150Margay Leah Justice, author of Nora’s Soul:

1. For me, writing is like creating a baby. There is the conception (what a wonderful idea!), the writing/rewriting period (gestation, anyone?) and the birth (I can’t believe it’s finally here!). And then you nurture it for the next couple of years as you slowly introduce it to the public – and hope they don’t think it’s an ugly baby.

2. The most thrilling thing about getting published is the sense of accomplishment when you see it in print for the first time and you discover that people actually like it!

3. The most humbling thing about getting published is seeing the book in print for the first time and realizing that all of those years of struggling, writing, rewriting, submitting – all boil down to this one little book that you can hold in the palm of your hand.

Chris2-132x150Christine Husom, author of Murder in Winnebago County and Buried in Wolf Lake:

1. Writing is multi-faceted for me. It is a joy, but also pretty hard work at times. I do much of my writing in my mind and when I finally sit down to get it on paper, it often comes out differently. I spend more time mentally forming plots and picturing scenes than I do writing them. I love having a whole day here and there to sit at my computer and concentrate on writing. If I have problems with a scene, I skip ahead to the next one so I don’t get frustrated.

2. The most thrilling thing about being published is getting my books out of my house and into readers’ hands–hoping people get some enjoyment reading them.

3. The most humbling thing about getting published is seeing mistakes and typos in what I thought was an error-free manuscript!

Amy_12_1-113x151Amy De Trempe, author of Loving Lydia and Pure is the Heart:

1. Writing for me is like unmapped journey, I never know what turns, obstacles or excitement is about to unfold.

2. The most thrilling thing about getting published is seeing my name on a book cover.

3. The most humbling thing about getting published is finding out how supportive and happy my friends and family really are for me.

maggiemed-138x150Mairead Walpole, author of A Love Out of Time:

1. In some ways, writing is a form of therapy. Not from a “work out my issues” standpoint, but rather it allows me to escape from the day to day stresses of the world. I can let the creative, sometimes a little off-beat, imaginative part of my soul off the leash and let it run. Some of my very early writing did dip into the realm of “working out my issues” and those stories will never see the light of day!

2. Can I channel my inner Sallie Fields and run around saying, “They liked it, they really liked it…”? No? Darn. Seriously, I think it is the whole – I did this – aspect. Someone read the book and thought it was worth publishing. That is pretty cool no matter how you cut it. 

3. Opening yourself up to criticism, being vulnerable. Sure, you know that not everyone is going to love your book, and intellectually you know that some people will hate it and think you are a hack, but when someone actually expresses that to you it is a whole new experience. It can be very humbling.

IMG_4132-use-115x154Suzette Vaughn, author of Badeaux Knights and Mortals, Gods, and a Muse:

1. I’m like a humming bird on too much caffine. I write in waves. When the wave hits I can put out several thousand words in an unbelievably small amount of time. Then when I’m not in humming bird mode I edit. 

2. The most thrilling is probably the fact that there are people out there that I don’t know that have read my book and liked it. I had the pleasure a few times of meeting them and there is some twinkle in their eye that is amazing.

3. My son is always hummbling. I recieved my proofs in the mail and my then seven year old son didn’t fully understand what it meant that I’d written a book. He flips through the pages looking for hand-writting. “I get in trouble when I write in books.” 

jjdare-139x150JJ Dare, author of False Positive and False World:

1. Writing is like being in a triathlon for me. I power write for days or weeks at a time, then crash for awhile with the help of Tylenol and chocolate. Writing is a scary, exciting roller-coaster. It is exhilarating and draining, and Iwouldn’t do it any other way.

2. The most thrilling thing about getting published is the very act of being published! Something I wrote is out there, available for anyone to read. Holding the hard copy of my book in my hands gives me the good shivers. The other thrill is the pride in my family’s voices when they introduce me as “The Writer.”

3. The most humbling thing is feeling responsible for the places I take my readers. During the time they’re walking with and living the lives of the characters in my book, my readers are taking the same roller-coaster ride I took to write the
book.

pat-135x150Pat Bertram, author of More Deaths Than OneA Spark of Heavenly Fire, and Daughter Am I:

1.  For me, writing is like the world’s longest crossword puzzle, one that takes a year to complete. I like playing with words, finding their rhythm, and getting them to behave the way I want. I like being able to take those words and create ideas, characters, and emotions.

2.  I wasn’t thrilled at seeing the first printed proof copy of my first book because I knew it was just a proof copy — more work for me on the road to publication. By the time I saw the finished book, I’d gone through at least five proof copies, and was so sick of the sight of it that I took a quick look and put it away. Someday perhaps, I will find the thrill of being published, but to be honest it was anti-climatic. I am more thrilled at the thought of what the future might bring.

3. I had no intention of answering these questions. After all, I am the hosting the authors of Second Wind, but a fellow author said, “This is your party, too. People will tune in because of you. They want to know more about YOU than anyone else. Don’t cheat your fans and followers.” Now that’s humbling.

Introducing Michelle Izmaylov (FutureWord Publishing)

Michelle Izmaylov has joined the staff of FutureWord Publishing as an editor. Publisher Laurie Foston says:

About seven years ago, an eleven-year-old girl was immersed in a children’s favorite—Harry Potter. Her favorite place to read: a leather couch in the living room. It was a reading place she shared with her younger sister, Nicole. Five years old at the time, Nicole loved the idea of Harry Potter. Unfortunately, because her reading skills were undeveloped, it seemed she wouldn’t be able to read the book for years to come.

So, the elder sister got an idea. The sisters shared a love of fantasy and adventure. With their mutual fascination in mind, she sat down at her computer, fingers at the keys, and created a series of short stories that Nicole would be able to read. One tale followed another, but every story plunged the sisters into the adventures of a girl who discovered a magical pocket watch that teleported her to alien planets.

It wasn’t long before the story was complete and gathering dust on a lonely shelf. Perhaps it would have stayed that way forever, but fate in the form of a seventh grade language arts teacher intervened. On day, the students received an assignment: compose a story, type it up, print it out, and bring it to class. Make it two pages. Maybe three, if you’re particularly daring. And the elder sister came up with a brilliant idea.

She would bring the series of short stories to class.

Brushing off her dust collection, she came to class the following day with a fifty-page manuscript in hand. Incredulous but equally impressed, her teacher suggested a ‘novel’ concept: getting published.

“That’s how it all began,” says Michelle Izmaylov, now the teen author of three published novels. After self-publishing her first book, The Pocket Watch, she was fascinated with the world of literature. Her second novel explored her life from a realistic perspective, often using the lives of her friends as inspiration for her characters. Dream Saver follows the quest of teenager Taylor Creekmore as she battles against all odds to save a loved one.

To publish her second book, Michelle decided to find a traditional publisher. So, she went to the Internet to learn more about the publishing business. She wrote and printed dozens of query letters and mailed them out to publishers she hoped would be interested in her story. Two hundred and fifty rejections and many months later, Michelle breathed a sigh of resignation and accepted her fate: failure.

But Nicole was not ready to see her sister give up. She convinced Michelle to press on and never lose hope. Resolved in a new direction, Michelle read about a national short story contest with a new publishing company. Entering upon Nicole’s encouragements, she won first place and asked the publisher to take a look at her novel Dream Saver. The publisher read the book, enjoyed the story, and decided to publish the novel. The novel was a success and sold over 45,000 copies.

But Michelle’s passion for writing was only beginning to flame. “It’d been four years since I wrote my first book, and when I went back to read it, I thought I could do better,” Michelle said. “The story also really fascinated me, and I wanted to go deeper into the adventures of the girl and her pocket watch.”

At age fifteen, she decided to transform her original novel into a trilogy, The Galacteran Legacy. The first book in the new series is Galaxy Watch, which tells the story of ordinary Earth girl Nicole Sky who never dreams that the golden pocket watch she discovers one summer day will change her life forever. Only when Nicole—by no coincidence also the name of Michelle’s sister—finds herself on a hostile alien planet and in the midst of a war does she realize Earth has a deadline.

“My life isn’t all about writing,” she says, and in some ways Michelle is a suburban teenager. She enjoys hanging out with friends and watching a good weekly movie. “I’m also a bit of a tomboy, so you can be sure I’ll sneak a few hours out of every week to play on my PS2,” Michelle says with a laugh. Her life also has a firm root in her family’s Russian culture and traditions, and she appreciates the close bonds she shares with her parents and sister. “We are all very devoted to one another, and I love that connection. I can always count on my family for anything.”

This teen author also loves to find ways to connect with her community. Several years ago, she discovered that Russian immigrants in her community have problems understanding English when visiting physicians. Making use of her Russian language skills, she volunteers as a translator. Now, she regularly visits elementary and middle schools and public libraries to share her experiences as a teen published author.

“It’s an amazing journey every time both for me and the young people I visit,” Michelle said of the writer’s workshops and discussions she hosts. “I hope to be able to inspire the authors of tomorrow to realize you’re never too young to follow your dreams.”

And Michelle is not alone in her love of literature. Her sister, Nicole, is both a nationally recognized poet and a budding author. In fact, she is busy working on her own fantasy novel. “[Nicole] is also helping me out with the second book in the trilogy,” Michelle said. “Without her, there probably wouldn’t even be a series. She’s my editor-in-chief, and I’m really grateful for her help. I couldn’t do it without her.”

What’s next for the teen author? For now, her summer is full of writing. In addition to working the science fiction and young adult novel editor at FutureWord Publishing, she is busy writing the second book in The Galacteran Legacy trilogy, which continues Nicole’s adventures. When asked about the actual process of writing, Michelle says she has no clear structure in mind.

“It’s like the characters are telling me their story,” says Michelle. “More than anything, I’m just a kid with a laptop jotting notes.”

Introducing Valerie Bouthyette (FutureWord Publishing)

Several businesses are joining forces to back FutureWord, a new publishing group formed by Laurie Foston, aka Cheryl Haynes.

Valerie Bouthyette is known for her prolific art and dazzling illustrations that have entertained children all over the United States. Valerie has a degree in Graphic Design from SUNY. Valerie will still have her own business but she will represent FutureWord in their acquisitions of children’s illustrated books. Valerie says:

Valerie!I began creating as soon as I could hold a crayon. I still look at images I had created when I was three that my mother had saved and think to myself how lucky I was to have parents who recognized my talents and encouraged me and my sisters to make the arts a part of their lives growing up.

My oldest sister Susan was also a visual artist. Having the opportunity to watch her create not only supported my own endeavors but challenged me to become “a better artist” than she was. My second oldest and first youngest had us all playing fold guitar and singing together and my youngest sister Allison continues to be a wonderful writer although she has yet to venture into the world of publishing beyond the workplace.

I began entering art shows as a young child and quickly won acclaim, but as a young college students was urged into graphic design (the most lucrative field for young artists at the time where I spent 20 some odd year) and here I worked more with design elements than illustration. This and fine arts competitions kept me busy as I raised my children.

My children, also very artistic (both musicians, fine artists and writers) were successful students however the school districts they were involved with and the small towns we lived in offered little for the youth of our communities beyond sports. This is what prompted me to become actively involved in establishing community arts centers which promoted youth participation.

In 1998 I founded CATS (Cultural Arts of Taneytown – MD) which offered summer arts classes for students from voice eating-with-ghostsand piano lessons to photography, visual arts and writing. This program was later adopted by the township. Later in 2001, I founded the Pocono Mountain Arts Council (www.poconomac.com) which is still healthy and actively growing in Monroe County, Pennsylvania. This group provided children’s art exhibits linked with local businesses and partnered with local colleges

Our mission was to provide avenues of creative expression, education, and dedication to enriching the lives of those we touch; to help others to express who they are, imagine what could be and share their vision with the community, through the world of art. “Art has the Power to Bring us Together while Fostering an Appreciation for our Differences and Celebrating our Similarities” –Val Vigliotti, PoconoMAC Founder

I have also dabbled with the written word and have published two works. The first, Messenger Boy, a young reader historical fiction Messenger Boy under the pen name of VJ Spindler published by Publish America in 2004 and The Christmas Dress , a romantic comedy released in 2007 under the name of Valerie Bouthyette. I am currently working on a new title to be release next year.

It wasn’t until years later (and with the support of my children and second husband) that I dove full time into illustrating for children. I was finally able to concentrate on my craft full time and what a fabulous experience I am having. I am told I have a keen ability to visualize the words and feelings portrayed by writers, to breathe life into their work; but it is without doubt, a joint effort. It is the authors’ words which stir my imagination; the illustrations flow easily when mixed with my talent.

When asked to join the staff of Future Word Publishing there was no hesitation. It has been a long time since I’ve come across such a passionate group of people who are dedicated to providing the public with the phenomenal work of noted and new authors alike.

Introducing Lazarus Barnhill, Author of THE MEDICINE PEOPLE and LACEY TOOK A HOLIDAY

Isn’t the Internet a wonderful thing! Something happens almost two years ago, and there it sits like a time capsule for all to see.

fullI met Lazarus Barnhill during a writing contest on Gather.com in October 2007. Entrants posted the first chapter of their work for people to comment on and vote for, and the fifteen top-ranked chapters plus ten chosen by Gather management went on to post the second chapter for more voting. I read some of the chapters, including Laz’s The Medicine People, but I never knew quite what to say about them. Lazarus, on the other hand, wrote marvelous critiques of everyone’s chapters. And he responded to everyone who commented on his. (I didn’t realize this until tonight when I went searching for the comment I left him. Where did he get the time?)

My comment: I may have the (unofficial) lead now, but I have a hunch that things are going to be heating up. Great entry! Good luck. (I still don’t understand by what fluke I ended up in first place for a couple of weeks, but there it is.)

Laz’s response: Pat, I’m looking forward to reading More Deaths Than One. Your entry has run away from the rest of us and I suspect there’s good reason for that. Continued good luck in the contest. BTW, stay healthy. If something happens to the guy in first place, who are they going to suspect, eh?

Neither of us won the contest, but we ended up finishing consecutively, and yes, Lazarus passed me by. Almost a year later, we met again at Second Wind Publishing, which has released both More Deaths Than One and The Medicine People.

Now that I’ve read The Medicine People, I still don’t quite know what to say. Well, yes I do. “This is a good book. Readn1526866242_30175998_5008 it.” But that’s not exactly a review, and I promised to write one. I can tell you that the book is a mystery with a sub-story of love in all its guises, but that’s not a review, either. I can tell you that it’s my favorite type of story, where some past action — in this case a murder that was committed twenty-five years ago — affected the characters’ lives, and now the search for the truth turns those lives upside down again. Hmmm. Maybe you could check out The Medicine People for yourself. That will get me off the hook!

Blurbs and reviews: The Medicine People

Find out more about Lazarus Barnhill: Author Bio

Discuss writing as destiny with Lazarus Barnhill on the Second Wind Facebook group discussion forum: The Most Unexpected Truth About Writing